Three centuries of English crops yields

1211-1491

Home   Acknowledgements Sources The Data Chronologies Database  

Many organisations and institutions have contributed directly and indirectly to creation of the medieval crop yields database and its public release at this website.  The most important are acknowledged below.


For institutional support
The School of Geography, Archaeology, and Palaeoecology
The Queen’s University of Belfast


For funding

ESRC logo

Economic and Social Research Council, £91,000 for the project [RES 000-23-0645] ‘Crops yields, environmental conditions, and historical change, 1270-1430’, Feb. 2005 to May 2007.

 

 

British Academy logo

British Academy, £7,270 for the project [SG-39256] ‘Harvest failure and success: crop yields on the Kent manors of Canterbury Cathedral Priory, c.1275-c.1375’, May to Aug. 2005.

 

 

Sussex Archaeological Society logo

Sussex Archaeological Society, Margary Grant, £1,220 for the project ‘Harvest failure and success: crop yields on the Battle Abbey manor of Alciston, East Sussex, 1300-1500’, Nov. 2005 to March 2006.

 

 

For copyright permission

University of Saskatchewan Archives

For permission to access, copy, use, and release yield calculations made by Professor D. L. Farmer for the estates of the bishops of Winchester and abbey of Westminster.

http://www.usask.ca/archives/databases.php

University of Saskatchewan Archives

Dr Jan Titow and Cambridge University Press for permission to copy and release in electronic format his yield calculations for the estates of the bishops of Winchester published in:

J. Z. Titow, Winchester yields: a study in medieval agricultural productivity, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1972).

Also, Dr Jan Titow for permission to use tabulations of data extracted from the Winchester Pipe Rolls contained in his unpublished papers preserved at the Hampshire Record Office, Winchester.

http://calm.hants.gov.uk/DServeA/search.htm

 


Logo of British Library


The British Library for permission to reproduce on this website the image of men stacking sheaves from the lower margin of folio 173 of the Luttrell Psalter [British Library Add. 42130].

For data contributed
Dr David Stone, who contributed his calculations of crop yields on the manor of Wisbech Barton, Cambridgeshire, as used in his book: Decision-making in medieval agriculture, Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2005.


For assistance with data collection
Dr Marilyn Livingstone, who transcribed the data for Silkstead, Hampshire, and who assisted in transcribing the data for the estates of Canterbury Cathedral Priory.
Christopher Whittick and Anne Drewery, who transcribed the data for Alciston, Sussex.


For archival assistance:
The staff of the following archives and record offices: the British Library, Canterbury Cathedral Archives (especially Cressida Annesley), East Sussex Record Office (especially Christopher Whittick), Hampshire Record Office (especially Sarah Lewin), The National Archives, the Norfolk Record Office (especially Paul Rutledge), University of Saskatchewan Archives (especially Cheryl Avery and Patrick Hayes), Winchester Cathedral Archives.


For methodological and statistical advice

Professor Gregory Clark of the Department of Economics, University of California at Davis

Professor Gregory Clark of the Department of Economics, University of California at Davis, both for recommending the STATA statistical package as the most appropriate tool for combining the manor-level yield data into aggregate chronologies and providing basic guidance in how to use it.

For technical assistance

Queen's University of Belfast

The Centre for Data Digitisation at The Queen’s University of Belfast (director: Dr Paul Ell) for making scanned copies of David Farmer’s manuscript notes, for converting all hard-copy tabulations into electronic format, and for integrating all electronic materials into a single database. Particular thanks are due to Elaine Yeates, David Hardy, and Karleigh Patterson.

For web-page creation and maintenance
The Centre for Data Digitisation at The Queen’s University of Belfast (especially Elaine Yeates and David Hardy); Information Services, The Queen’s University of Belfast.